Traffick - The Business of Search Engines & Web Portals
Blog Categories (aka Tags) Archive of Traffick Articles Our Internet Marketing Consulting Services Contact the Traffickers Traffick RSS Feed

Tuesday, February 07, 2006

Google Sends a Message to BMW: Unfortunately, the Wrong One

I come from a liberal, non-punishing type of family.

I remember when my sis and I were raising a ruckus as small children, we'd usually be convinced to shape up with a few words, or well-placed silences. But sometimes we wouldn't be, so our parents would half-jokingly say: "Quieten down up there or I'm coming up there with a big stick!" The problem with that one, of course, is that children are insatiably curious. After awhile, we'd stay up a bit later and make a bit more noise just to test when the "big stick" threat would rear its implausible head. And finally, we demanded to actually see the big stick. Foolishly, Mom decided she'd better come up with something, so we were led to a closet where were shown a rather pathetic-looking yardstick. "That doesn't look very big," we mused. Realizing that the threat had turned into a fun game, for our semi-laid-back domestic enforcers, it was back to mean stares, mock outrage, hushed tones, and moral suasion. (The unfortunate side effect of the Internet is that said ogres will be reading this post inside of one day, even though they're enjoying winter on the other side of the planet. Look, Ma, I'm airing our squeaky-clean laundry in public!)

Well, purveyors of deceptive online content, and index spammers, aren't children. They're members of an economic game that affects millions of businesses. The future social development of hard-core cloakers isn't something that keeps me awake nights. Fair rules that apply to all are much more important than spammers' sensibilities. Are you a big company that got "duped" by your "deceptive" SEO firm? Shame on you, then. SEO has been around for ten years, and it's time you did your due diligence.

So if Google's going to pull out the big stick on big brand name companies who engage in garden-variety spam techniques, then I say, make it a really big mofo'in club, like the ones you used to see in the Flintstones. Ban them for a year. Take that, you wascals. Right now, the message being sent is relatively benign. You'll get de-indexed, but if you grovel, you'll be back, and oh, by the way, as we've been saying ever since Florida, wouldja buy a few AdWords from us you cheapsakes?

The message to those who recommend riskier techniques is (for now), clear enough: here's the worst that can happen. The worst that can happen -- if you're a prominent firm with good grovel techniques anyway -- is a temporary slap on the wrist. For those who have more reason to go "gray" or "black hat"... the message couldn't be clearer: spam on. Google could be a lot more draconian.

In case you missed it: the news coverage claims BMW.de got the "death penalty" from Google. In fact they'll probably get out of the clink soon, with time off for good behavior. Or as the Flintstones theme put it: "that cat will stay out for the night."

This wacky "Google is being Orwellian" post gets a good rejoinder from Danny, if you scroll down the page. Along with Danny, I see no reason at all to consider a search engine out of bounds for strict censures against optimization techniques that are clearly deceptive to users. Search engines are built around automation and math, but they are also editorial organizations that have the right to set their own ranking rules based on what they think is best for consumers and fairest to all companies that are vying for rankings.

Imbroglio aside, it doesn't affect my inner debate: will that be a BMW 323i, 325xi, or [used cars used cars used bmw canada britney spears autoblog edmunds car parts comparison bmw] 330xi?

Man, I hate when irrelevant keywords interrupt my dreams.

Posted by Andrew Goodman




View Posts by Category

 

Speaking Engagement

I am speaking at SMX West

Need Solid Advice?        

Google AdWords book


Andrew's book, Winning Results With Google AdWords, (McGraw-Hill, 2nd ed.), is still helping tens of thousands of advertisers cut through the noise and set a solid course for campaign ROI.

And for a glowing review of the pioneering 1st ed. of the book, check out this review, by none other than Google's Matt Cutts.


Posts from 2002 to 2010


07/2002
08/2002
09/2002
10/2002
11/2002
12/2002
01/2003
02/2003
03/2003
04/2003
05/2003
06/2003
07/2003
08/2003
09/2003
10/2003
11/2003
12/2003
01/2004
02/2004
03/2004
04/2004
05/2004
06/2004
07/2004
08/2004
09/2004
10/2004
11/2004
12/2004
01/2005
02/2005
03/2005
04/2005
05/2005
06/2005
07/2005
08/2005
09/2005
10/2005
11/2005
12/2005
01/2006
02/2006
03/2006
04/2006
05/2006
06/2006
07/2006
08/2006
09/2006
10/2006
11/2006
12/2006
01/2007
02/2007
03/2007
04/2007
05/2007
06/2007
07/2007
08/2007
09/2007
10/2007
11/2007
12/2007
01/2008
02/2008
03/2008
04/2008
05/2008
06/2008
07/2008
08/2008
09/2008
10/2008
11/2008
12/2008
01/2009
02/2009
03/2009
04/2009
05/2009
06/2009
07/2009
08/2009
09/2009
10/2009
11/2009
12/2009
01/2010
02/2010
03/2010
04/2010

Recent Posts


How a Cuddly Liberal Became King of All Media

RSS Forecast Mostly Sunny

Advertiser IQ Test

Cold-Callin' SEO Firms

Memory Leak Fixed in Firefox 1.5.0.1?

Did Google Miss?

Google is the Media / Internet / God

Searcholicious Stats

Do You Zoom-Zoom? Branded Keyword Use Now Mainstre...

China, Internet Behavior, and Censorship

 


Traffick - The Business of Search Engines & Web Portals

 


Home | Categories | Archive | About Us | Internet Marketing Consulting | Contact Us
© 1999 - 2013 Traffick.com. All Rights Reserved