Traffick - The Business of Search Engines & Web Portals
Blog Categories (aka Tags) Archive of Traffick Articles Our Internet Marketing Consulting Services Contact the Traffickers Traffick RSS Feed

Thursday, October 01, 2009

Bryan Eisenberg (.com): Guru, Teacher, Dad, Friend... and Just Plain Right

It's unusual to post on the launch of a blog from someone you may have already heard of - in this case Future Now founder, prolific author, and globally recognized conversion improvement (Persuasion Architecture) speaker, Bryan Eisenberg.

For example, I never got the chance to say - hey guys, Seth Godin's got a blog, you should check it out! That would have been absurd. You would have found it yourself.

I probably mentioned Danny Sullivan's blog, Daggle, when I found it, because he writes so much professionally that many in the industry found it fascinating how much personal insight he snuck in over at Daggle. Just illustrating the wide range of sensibilities people bring to the mix between personal and professional. There aren't any hard and fast rules here.

Having the chance to catch up with Bryan in Norway (on a 2 hour fjord boat tour, among other things), I certainly had a great opportunity to take in the personal side. It isn't to Bryan's taste to share much of that publicly, so BryanEisenberg.com, his new site, is strictly for professional purposes.

Despite Bryan's caution with oversharing online, audiences and colleagues like Bryan for more than just what he says. They take in the full spectrum of who he is: passionate about personas, obsessed with conversions, innovative in business models, but also, Brooklynite, newly-inspired lifestyle guru, dad, and a confident speaker with a wacky sense of humor (who never fails to derail the momentum with that gross dog diarrhea example... j/k Bryan). And the reasons for him shifting the locus of operations to the website with the personal name is connected to what makes him tick today. His primary passion is speaking, writing, and teaching, so it stands to reason that to get more quality speaking gigs he should have a website that says, "hey guys, it's me, Bryan Eisenberg".

I learned a few things hanging out with Bryan last week. They fall into a few categories. The first was just some kind of confirmation about how many regular global speakers share the same attitude towards the travel thing and the places they visit. They don't party too much (it's all relative), because on their day off they want to hit the ground running and walk for many miles to take in every sight they can. And when you're walking with them, aside from the local culture and business topics, they invariably talk about family. Well, of course. They miss them!

I also learned that you can make an immensely good living if you figure out what you're passionate about and focus on that without comparing yourself to anyone else. This may be nothing new, but either the dot com bust in 2001-2 or the current economic malaise got a lot of people. Waylaid them on their march to global supremacy. Made them ask, to cite the Po Bronson book title, What Should I Do With My Life?

It just may be that Bryan's next book would be a good sequel to Bronson's. Stay tuned for more on that from Bryan.

Bryan is no longer going to work 15 hour days grinding himself into dust. He'll work more efficiently and take time out to relax, be with family, and religiously follow his new exercise and diet regimen. You guessed it: Bryan's new life dovetails with the title of a forthcoming (marketing strategy meets personal empowerment) book he'll be working on: "Trim the Fat!" In the end, I bet he winds up earning more in his newly streamlined lifestyle. But in the meantime, he'll also have strengthened his whole life, to say nothing of his heart, lungs, etc. He's lost 50 lbs. since March... and is still going.

More practically, hearing Bryan confirm his persona as a sought-after speaker was a reminder to me that there is a marketplace for fantastic, value-adding speakers. In his groundbreaking book, Free, Chris Anderson recently related the Stewart Brand clarification that "commodity information wants to be free, and scarce information wants to be expensive." Combine scarce with motivating and mobilizing, and that's information that businesses will pay for and travel for.

I tend to think the conference circuit worked itself into a glut of events overfilled with so-so speakers who are pretty fair at putting out eight minutes of material. That's OK, but there's just too much of it. Like Bryan, I don't have any intention of contributing to the glut of 8-minute sound-bite-style presentations any more than I have to in the coming years. (That's part of why you'll see me delivering a full 45 minute standalone, Advanced Paid Search Brain Candy, at SES Chicago in December.)

None of this friendly stuff would matter to most of us, though, unless Bryan's material was constantly inspiring us to test new things with our websites, whether it be using a formal tool like Google Website Optimizer in concert with tips in the book he co-authored, Always Be Testing, or applying principles more broadly to different forms of problem-solving. Bryan's brain is the main thing that motivates me to hover nearby. :)

From time to time I'll offer more concrete examples here, no doubt. But for brevity's sake, just one for now. Persuasion Architecture puts much stock in the typology of four types of information searchers based on the dimensions fast vs. slow, and emotional vs. logical -- resulting in four basic personality types: competitive, methodical, spontaneous, and humanistic. My personal take is that as psychology, this is very rough-edged. But it is also very germane psychology when it comes to our task as interface designers and marketing communicators. Eye tracking studies showing the behavior of the four types are almost hilarious in how evocative they are in showing how people's searching and comparison shopping behavior differs. Those doggone methodical people stare down every link and heading on the page!

So in Q&A after his keynote talk in Oslo, I was curious to find out why a variety of "competitive" elements (of marketing copy, interfaces, etc.) seem to repeatedly test out so well in the direct response world (Google AdWords, landing pages, purchase conversions). Is the world becoming more competitive? Are frequent purchasers skewing towards more competitive types of people?

In Bryan's view, overall the trend is for buyers to use logic more than they once did, and less emotion, at least using online interfaces. (So, competitive is a subset of that use of logic, it's just the hair-trigger version.) This may be chicken-egg. Certain interfaces prompt us to be more logical and especially competitive as to how quickly we can get to the "right" solution for us. The tools are better. Those of us who are even slightly predisposed towards this are not easily taken in by that cute hero shot - though humanistic elements may lurk in the background to support the strength of brands. In our behavior, we flit from site to site. Finding best deals, comparing from bigger inventories. Finding more unique products from companies with niche (but better) products, and being able to buy quickly while getting to know the designer (OK, so that's just a tad humanistic). We're wringing every bit of performance out of this "buy now machine" called the digital world that we possibly can.

Going against that trend may prove expensive. In a naked digital world, your customer may be wearing a more dispassionate hat than you expect. And the definition of "in a hurry" keeps changing. Everyone gets faster, even the methodicals. Hide the banana and yet another of your prospects just may puke before you can finish the sentence "my bounce rate sucks."

Labels:

Posted by Andrew Goodman




View Posts by Category

 

Speaking Engagement

I am speaking at SMX East

Need Solid Advice?        

Google AdWords book


Andrew's book, Winning Results With Google AdWords, (McGraw-Hill, 2nd ed.), is still helping tens of thousands of advertisers cut through the noise and set a solid course for campaign ROI.

And for a glowing review of the pioneering 1st ed. of the book, check out this review, by none other than Google's Matt Cutts.


Posts from 2002 to 2010


07/2002
08/2002
09/2002
10/2002
11/2002
12/2002
01/2003
02/2003
03/2003
04/2003
05/2003
06/2003
07/2003
08/2003
09/2003
10/2003
11/2003
12/2003
01/2004
02/2004
03/2004
04/2004
05/2004
06/2004
07/2004
08/2004
09/2004
10/2004
11/2004
12/2004
01/2005
02/2005
03/2005
04/2005
05/2005
06/2005
07/2005
08/2005
09/2005
10/2005
11/2005
12/2005
01/2006
02/2006
03/2006
04/2006
05/2006
06/2006
07/2006
08/2006
09/2006
10/2006
11/2006
12/2006
01/2007
02/2007
03/2007
04/2007
05/2007
06/2007
07/2007
08/2007
09/2007
10/2007
11/2007
12/2007
01/2008
02/2008
03/2008
04/2008
05/2008
06/2008
07/2008
08/2008
09/2008
10/2008
11/2008
12/2008
01/2009
02/2009
03/2009
04/2009
05/2009
06/2009
07/2009
08/2009
09/2009
10/2009
11/2009
12/2009
01/2010
02/2010
03/2010
04/2010

Recent Posts


An Open Letter to Couples Resort in Algonquin Park...

To Ev and Biz: Click Arbitrage Tips for Twitter

Adam Lasnik: Super Top Secret SEO Takeaways

First Impression: Inside Larry and Sergey's Brain

Sorry-We're-Not-Google Campaign #385

DoubleClick Ad Exchange: Myth (2009) and Reality (...

Pump. Dump. Lather. Rinse. Repeat.

The Concept of Paid Search Auction Pliability

The Recession in Opportunity

What About Getting Me More Leads? Tangential vs. T...

 


Traffick - The Business of Search Engines & Web Portals

 


Home | Categories | Archive | About Us | Internet Marketing Consulting | Contact Us
© 1999 - 2013 Traffick.com. All Rights Reserved