Traffick - The Business of Search Engines & Web Portals
Blog Categories (aka Tags) Archive of Traffick Articles Our Internet Marketing Consulting Services Contact the Traffickers Traffick RSS Feed

Saturday, August 16, 2003

See you at SES!

The Traffick Team won't be blogging much, if at all, the week of Aug. 18 due to the big shindig known as Search Engine Strategies in San Jose, CA. If you're coming, feel free to stop by the Traffick booth and say "hi" (the Traffick booth being wherever Andrew and I are standing at that particular moment). If you're not coming, I have nothing more to say to you.

Andrew's session titled "Writing Search Engine Ads" will be on Tuesday from 2 to 3:30 p.m. So come on by, and hear Dr. AdWords tell 'em how it's done!

Posted by Cory
| | Permalink

 

Yahoo "Might" Continue AltaVista

Here's one of those semi-interesting articles that says something "might" happen. This time it's from ComputerWeekly, and they claim that Yahoo might not pull AV off life support, because:

"We believe that the AltaVista brand is still very strong, and has come to attract a particular type of user, and it is entirely possible that we may keep the AltaVista site to serve a particular niche of users," said Yahoo senior vice president for engineering Phu Hoang.

Hmm, just who is this "particular niche" of users, I wonder? Could it be, people who are insane and have never heard of Google or Teoma? Or, maybe it's just webmasters who still check their rankings in AV on the off chance that some old computer geek die-hard fan of the original "good" search engine might be searching?

Hoang does slightly clarify the point about keeping AV around for a while, but this point was made already back when the Yahoo deal was announced:

"I think that there may be opportunity for us to try new search features and new capabilities that are a little bit on the edge, that we are not yet ready to show up in the mainstream."

So, basically, an admission that no one uses AV anymore, so why not knock yourself out?

Posted by Cory
| | Permalink

 

MSN Search "Tests" Could Impact LookSmart's Bottom Line, Company Admits

Dow Jones Business News reports that LookSmart shares plunged 20% Friday in light of the company's second-quarter report, which admitted that changes at MSN Search could affect LookSmart's revenues from the current search partnership, and might also affect MSN's decision to renew its contract with LookSmart in the future.

Amongst other things, LookSmart said:

"Based on our discussions with Microsoft, it is likely that the licensing portion of the agreement will be renewed, but that it will result in less licensing revenue than under the current agreement."

A recent contract with Lycos to become the featured search partner would soften the blow of any loss in Microsoft revenue, but only slightly. MSN referrals account for more than half of LookSmart's revenue.

Posted by Andrew
| | Permalink

 

Thursday, August 14, 2003

Google + Math Functions = Hint of Bigger Things to Come?

When I first heard about Google following AlltheWeb's footsteps by integrating math functions into its search box, I was nonplussed. But, after thinking about it a bit more, I think this is a development worthy of highlighting.

When you read through the list of available tools offered by Google's simple, little search box, you begin to see a bigger picture developing, one in which you can save enormous amounts of time by utilizing a central place to find ALL kinds of information, whatever the context.

I mean, when Google can tell you what you really want to know when you search on "half a cup in teaspoons," that's impressive. This type of near-artificial intelligence opens new doors of possibility that I think only hint at what's to come in the search engine space.

If search technology continues to improve, and if the Internet does become as ubiquitous as it seems to be doing, then search engines will not only slay the yellow pages, but they will become, IMHO, the most important sources of technology in history. No kidding!

Posted by Cory
| | Permalink

 

Wednesday, August 13, 2003

T-Online Bombshell Shows the Portal Wars Rage On Globally

CNET's Stefanie Olsen reports that T-Online, Germany's leading Internet Service Provider and largest web property, has abruptly ended its sponsored listings contract with Overture Services, opting to sign a long-term agreement with Google for search and sponsored listings instead.

My first reaction to this announcement was to wonder whether the change was prompted by the fact that FAST Search, which currently powers web index listings for T-Online, is no longer perceived to be "European" since its acquisition by Pasadena-based Overture.

But the real story is Yahoo's takeover of Overture (and thus FAST Search as well). T-Online makes no bones about it. "We see Yahoo as one of our main competitors in several fields, so we've drawn on our change-of-control clause to terminate the contract," says a spokesman.

This type of situation is likely to continue to crop up in Europe, where strong indigenous ISP's and portals like T-Online and Wanadoo are in a tight race for market share against "global" (read: US) portals MSN, Yahoo, and AOL.

Much has been made of the fact that Google is losing contracts because it's seen as a competitor to some of the companies that it wants to partner with. But now that Yahoo controls Google's main competition, the same logic applies... perhaps even more so, since Yahoo competes in a number of channels whereas Google (in spite of its influence) is still, at the end of the day, a search engine.

Posted by Andrew
| | Permalink

 

"C'mon, Ted, it'll be fun. We're young, profitable, and best of all, you're allowed to run around the halls screaming 'Yahoo!'"

Michael Liedtke of the Associated Press duly notes (Yahoo! stalked Overture for over a year) that Overture CEO Ted Meisel will get a "raise" on his $290,000 Overture salary - to about $375,000 - when he becomes a VP at Yahoo.

The same public filings that Liedtke used to garner this info show that Meisel was compensated a bit better than that: he cashed in close to $10 million worth of Overture stock in 2002. Six figure salary? Ho hum.

Posted by Andrew
| | Permalink

 

Tuesday, August 12, 2003

I also tried to test the effectiveness of my car's air bags by removing them and then driving into a brick wall...

Check out this poor fellow. He stopped all online advertising for three months because he thought that would be the easiest way to test its effectiveness.

http://www.internetretailer.com/dailyNews.asp?id=9923

Well anyway, he found out retroactively that his online ads had been pretty darn effective, as without them, online sales plunged 45%.

All for the lack of some verrry basic tracking technology costing all of $20-100 per month.

Posted by Andrew
| | Permalink

 

Monday, August 11, 2003

Google Bans eBay Keywords

eBay has asked Google to stop using its “trademarked terms” as keywords, and Google has complied. This means advertisers can no longer make any use of eBay-related terms in their ads or keywords.

While this has sparked some debate over what “reasonable” rights to trademark use are, it’s amazing that more companies haven’t made the same request of Google and other sponsored listing providers. Lots of sites are bidding on company names, and many of their ads aren’t exactly complimentary.

Posted by Adam
| | Permalink

 

Jeeves, What's the Point of All This?

So Ask Jeeves is coming out with a new offline ad campaign under the direction of its "agency of record," Chiat/Day, and in the process, tried to garner a little free PR by shopping the story to journalists last week.

The point of this, we're told, is to emphasize the quality of the Teoma-powered search at Ask.com, and, well, to explain that this is about finding what you need, as opposed to asking questions and getting answers. According to Jeeves' marketing people, the goal is to get the site's total search market share of 3% a little closer to Jeeves' 11% reach figure. In other words, 11% of searchers are using Ask Jeeves at least once a month... but it isn't their engine of choice and they don't search there frequently.

Should they? Sure they should. Teoma is comparable to Google in many ways. But it strikes me that trying to get consumers to think of Ask Jeeves as a really good search engine, as opposed to a place to ask questions, is an insurmountable task. Most people by now are pretty well focused on Google as the #1 brand in search. If you ask them about Jeeves, they're likely to respond... "oh, yes, isn't that the one with the butler, the one that gives you answers to questions?" You could probably spend $100 million on ads without making a dent in that basic assumption around Jeeves' positioning.

So why are they burning their cash in this manner? What is it about some Internet companies that they seem to dislike having too much cash in the bank?

One supposes that Jeeves, rather than being positioned for a new place in consumers' hearts and minds, is actually being positioned for acquisition on favorable terms. That's the norm in the search business (and many other technologies as well), it seems. For all but the leading players, profitable quarters are assumed to be a temporary aberration, and management teams have frequent nightmares of being trapped in maze-like cubicle farms from which escape is impossible, and where all the walls have handwriting on them.

Related Traffick article: Differentiation Can Be Brutal in the Web Search Business

Posted by Andrew
| | Permalink

 

Sunday, August 10, 2003

3-2-1 Contact

There had been a database problem affecting our web-based contact form for the past few weeks, but the issue has finally been solved! So, if you tried to reach us lately but couldn't, please accept our apologies. But, it's back in action now, so feel free to contact us about... whatever!

Posted by Cory
| | Permalink

 

View Archived Posts

 

Speaking Engagement

I am speaking at SMX West

Need Solid Advice?        

Google AdWords book


Andrew's book, Winning Results With Google AdWords, (McGraw-Hill, 2nd ed.), is still helping tens of thousands of advertisers cut through the noise and set a solid course for campaign ROI.

And for a glowing review of the pioneering 1st ed. of the book, check out this review, by none other than Google's Matt Cutts.


Posts from 2002 to 2010


07/2002
08/2002
09/2002
10/2002
11/2002
12/2002
01/2003
02/2003
03/2003
04/2003
05/2003
06/2003
07/2003
08/2003
09/2003
10/2003
11/2003
12/2003
01/2004
02/2004
03/2004
04/2004
05/2004
06/2004
07/2004
08/2004
09/2004
10/2004
11/2004
12/2004
01/2005
02/2005
03/2005
04/2005
05/2005
06/2005
07/2005
08/2005
09/2005
10/2005
11/2005
12/2005
01/2006
02/2006
03/2006
04/2006
05/2006
06/2006
07/2006
08/2006
09/2006
10/2006
11/2006
12/2006
01/2007
02/2007
03/2007
04/2007
05/2007
06/2007
07/2007
08/2007
09/2007
10/2007
11/2007
12/2007
01/2008
02/2008
03/2008
04/2008
05/2008
06/2008
07/2008
08/2008
09/2008
10/2008
11/2008
12/2008
01/2009
02/2009
03/2009
04/2009
05/2009
06/2009
07/2009
08/2009
09/2009
10/2009
11/2009
12/2009
01/2010
02/2010
03/2010
04/2010
Traffick Blog Archive ::
June 30, 2002
July 21, 2002
July 28, 2002
August 04, 2002
August 25, 2002
September 01, 2002
September 08, 2002
September 15, 2002
September 22, 2002
September 29, 2002
October 06, 2002
October 13, 2002
October 20, 2002
October 27, 2002
November 03, 2002
November 10, 2002
November 17, 2002
November 24, 2002
December 01, 2002
December 15, 2002
December 22, 2002
December 29, 2002
January 05, 2003
January 12, 2003
January 19, 2003
January 26, 2003
February 02, 2003
February 09, 2003
February 16, 2003
February 23, 2003
March 02, 2003
March 09, 2003
March 16, 2003
March 23, 2003
March 30, 2003
April 06, 2003
April 13, 2003
April 20, 2003
April 27, 2003
May 04, 2003
May 11, 2003
May 18, 2003
May 25, 2003
June 01, 2003
June 08, 2003
June 15, 2003
June 22, 2003
June 29, 2003
July 06, 2003
July 13, 2003
July 20, 2003
July 27, 2003
August 03, 2003
August 10, 2003
August 17, 2003
August 24, 2003
August 31, 2003
September 07, 2003
September 14, 2003
September 21, 2003
September 28, 2003
October 05, 2003
October 12, 2003
October 19, 2003
October 26, 2003
November 02, 2003
November 09, 2003
November 16, 2003
November 23, 2003
November 30, 2003
December 07, 2003
December 14, 2003
December 21, 2003
December 28, 2003
January 04, 2004
January 11, 2004
January 18, 2004
January 25, 2004
February 01, 2004
February 08, 2004
February 15, 2004
February 22, 2004
February 29, 2004
March 07, 2004
March 14, 2004
March 21, 2004
March 28, 2004
April 04, 2004
April 11, 2004
April 18, 2004
April 25, 2004
May 02, 2004
May 09, 2004
May 16, 2004
May 23, 2004
May 30, 2004
June 06, 2004
June 13, 2004
June 20, 2004
June 27, 2004
July 11, 2004
July 18, 2004
July 25, 2004
August 01, 2004
August 08, 2004
August 15, 2004
August 22, 2004
August 29, 2004
September 05, 2004
September 12, 2004
September 19, 2004
September 26, 2004
October 03, 2004
October 10, 2004
October 17, 2004
October 24, 2004
October 31, 2004
November 07, 2004
November 14, 2004
November 21, 2004
November 28, 2004
December 05, 2004
December 12, 2004
December 19, 2004
January 02, 2005
January 09, 2005
January 16, 2005
January 23, 2005
January 30, 2005
February 06, 2005
February 13, 2005
February 20, 2005
February 27, 2005
March 06, 2005
March 13, 2005
March 20, 2005
March 27, 2005
April 03, 2005
April 10, 2005
April 17, 2005
April 24, 2005
May 01, 2005
May 08, 2005
May 15, 2005
May 22, 2005
May 29, 2005
June 05, 2005
June 12, 2005
June 19, 2005
June 26, 2005
July 03, 2005
July 10, 2005
July 17, 2005
July 24, 2005
July 31, 2005
August 07, 2005
August 14, 2005
August 21, 2005
August 28, 2005
September 04, 2005
September 11, 2005
September 18, 2005
September 25, 2005
October 02, 2005
October 09, 2005
October 16, 2005
October 23, 2005
October 30, 2005
November 06, 2005
November 13, 2005

 


Traffick - The Business of Search Engines & Web Portals

 


Home | Categories | Archive | About Us | Internet Marketing Consulting | Contact Us
© 1999 - 2013 Traffick.com. All Rights Reserved