Traffick - The Business of Search Engines & Web Portals
Blog Categories (aka Tags) Archive of Traffick Articles Our Internet Marketing Consulting Services Contact the Traffickers Traffick RSS Feed

Friday, September 12, 2003

New Traffick article: Everything I Know About Marketing, I Learned from Seinfeld

"Chicken salad, on rye, untoasted ... and a cup of tea." From the annals of Seinfeld reruns come timeless truths and contemporary observations on how business really works. There's no telling what can happen from this.

Posted by Andrew
| | Permalink

 

Thursday, September 11, 2003

Raise Your Hand if You've Ever Checked Your E-mail by Phone

I really don't understand the portals' fascination with offering services to check your e-mail by phone. AOL is now touting its AOLbyPhone package, as reported by News.com.

Gee willickers, you can pay an extra four bucks a month and be able to hear spam on the other line. Ain't technology grand?

Posted by Cory
| | Permalink

 

Spam Fighters, Rejoice!

The number of resources devoted to fighting spam is increasing every day, which is both good and bad. It's bad because we shouldn't have to waste time on this junk, but it's good because people are starting to arm themselves with knowledge. And together we can win the war!

PCWorld has launched Spam Watch, a portal page for spam-fighting information, downloads and other resources. Most of the time, these "topic centers" offered by computing magazines are lame and end up stagnating after a few months. Still, I'm hopeful that PCWorld will actually maintain and nurture this spam portal for many years to come.

Posted by Cory
| | Permalink

 

Wednesday, September 10, 2003

Overture and Homestore

The race for distribution of contextually-placed keyword-targeted text ads continues as Overture inks a deal with Homestore.

Posted by Andrew
| | Permalink

 

Snowball Your Traffic... or Burn for All Eternity?

I got a nice little email from Cory Rudl tonight. Luckily, it didn't catch me with my defenses down, since it was addressed to "Albert." When I sign up for these kinds of things with a name like "Albert," or "schmuck," it reminds me later on that the email really isn't personalized and that the correspondent isn't really my friend. To say the least.

There's been a resurgence of lying liars lying about search engine traffic lately. I hear the phone lines crackling with hope as SEM newbies (often experienced in many other facets of business) tell me about so-and-so and his world-class Google-foolin' tool. Sigh. The fact that so-and-so made half a million bucks selling the tool is supposed to be all the validation the tool needs, and the cycle of ignorance and time-wasting continues.

Rudl's communique included this little gem of a come-on:

"So you can finally submit your web site to 150 search engines and directories automatically, and...

"Snowball your traffic and sales with top-ranking positions in search engine "Giants" -- like Yahoo!, Google, and AltaVista!"

It doesn't take a day-long seminar to show how wrong this all is - two minutes is all it would take. Let's just start with the obvious: AltaVista is not a "giant," it's a once-mighty fallen giant currently resembling a drunken fruit fly, and rarely shows up in your server logs, no matter what you do, because users don't use AltaVista anymore. Might be nice if they did, but wishing don't make it so.

In fact, there are fewer than five, and for my money, really one or two, non-paid web indexes of note today. For most businesses, Google is it. (I happen to love Teoma too, and its parent company Ask Jeeves has 3% or more of total search market share, so they're definitely worth a mention.) Both Google and Teoma do a good job of making life hard on optimizers. Type "the real thing" into Teoma and in the resources list on the right hand side, you get some surprising stuff: a critique of Coca-Cola from a labor perspective. Aren't search engines cool? They sure are, but they have to be pretty smart to be this useful, lest they be overrun by spam. So you're never going to see 150 or even 20 viable unpaid search indexes. It's hard to run a search engine. That seems pretty obvious given that arguably the #2 pure non-paid search index in the world (yes Teoma offers a paid guaranteed inclusion option but it seems worth ignoring this) has at best 3% market share.

The mighty portals, controllers of considerable search traffic, run either Google results, paid inclusion indexes, or pay-per-click (generally a mix of all three). So again, the old submission tool will do diddly to get you "into" AOL, MSN, and Yahoo. Repeat after me: there is no free lunch.

So to all the bamboozlers out there still trying to shovel those useless search engine submission tools out the door, remember Elaine's evocative words: "The worst place in the world! With devils and those caves and the ragged clothing! And the heat! My god, the heat!"

Posted by Andrew
| | Permalink

 

Overture Gets Local

Overture Research, the recently announced experimental technology division of Overture, is toying with local advertising, according to News.com. The premise is to display pay-per-click ads for local businesses when performing a general search for "shoes," as an example.

Instead of being forced to wade through ads that may not represent companies local to your area, you would see ads for companies just down the street, which would be very helpful when doing research for products and then seeking local merchants that carry such products. This is a segment of PPC advertising that has yet to be tapped, and would be another good way for businesses to find and attract local consumers.

Overture's local search demo, while promising, leaves much to be desired. For example, in addition to entering their desired keywords, testers must also specify a zip code or city and state. Obviously, the benefit of the local angle is only realized if the search is transparent and elegant, not one that requires too much input from the user. This demo is more akin to a yellow pages search. My guess is that once this is rolled out, the algorithm behind it will detect your IP address or some other way for you to tell the search engine where you are, and it will do the rest. But, that's not happening yet.

Of course, Overture must struggle with how to determine when a user is searching for a local business and when a non-local source is sought, and that's an important detail.

This was a hot topic at SES in San Jose last month, and I wouldn't quarrel with estimates that this will be a $1 billion segment within five years. Advertisers should reap the benefits of lower competition for these local ads, and therefore, a lower cost-per-click. Should be fun to watch!

Posted by Cory
| | Permalink

 

Sunday, September 07, 2003

I Saw a Deadhead Sticker on an iMac

This study about the news consumption patterns of the "younger tech elite" (18 to 29) vs. the "older tech elite" (42 to 62) is presented the same way in this online story as it was in the televised news report I saw.

Notice anyone missing?

Posted by Andrew
| | Permalink

 

View Archived Posts

 

Speaking Engagement

I am speaking at SMX West

Need Solid Advice?        

Google AdWords book


Andrew's book, Winning Results With Google AdWords, (McGraw-Hill, 2nd ed.), is still helping tens of thousands of advertisers cut through the noise and set a solid course for campaign ROI.

And for a glowing review of the pioneering 1st ed. of the book, check out this review, by none other than Google's Matt Cutts.


Posts from 2002 to 2010


07/2002
08/2002
09/2002
10/2002
11/2002
12/2002
01/2003
02/2003
03/2003
04/2003
05/2003
06/2003
07/2003
08/2003
09/2003
10/2003
11/2003
12/2003
01/2004
02/2004
03/2004
04/2004
05/2004
06/2004
07/2004
08/2004
09/2004
10/2004
11/2004
12/2004
01/2005
02/2005
03/2005
04/2005
05/2005
06/2005
07/2005
08/2005
09/2005
10/2005
11/2005
12/2005
01/2006
02/2006
03/2006
04/2006
05/2006
06/2006
07/2006
08/2006
09/2006
10/2006
11/2006
12/2006
01/2007
02/2007
03/2007
04/2007
05/2007
06/2007
07/2007
08/2007
09/2007
10/2007
11/2007
12/2007
01/2008
02/2008
03/2008
04/2008
05/2008
06/2008
07/2008
08/2008
09/2008
10/2008
11/2008
12/2008
01/2009
02/2009
03/2009
04/2009
05/2009
06/2009
07/2009
08/2009
09/2009
10/2009
11/2009
12/2009
01/2010
02/2010
03/2010
04/2010
Traffick Blog Archive ::
June 30, 2002
July 21, 2002
July 28, 2002
August 04, 2002
August 25, 2002
September 01, 2002
September 08, 2002
September 15, 2002
September 22, 2002
September 29, 2002
October 06, 2002
October 13, 2002
October 20, 2002
October 27, 2002
November 03, 2002
November 10, 2002
November 17, 2002
November 24, 2002
December 01, 2002
December 15, 2002
December 22, 2002
December 29, 2002
January 05, 2003
January 12, 2003
January 19, 2003
January 26, 2003
February 02, 2003
February 09, 2003
February 16, 2003
February 23, 2003
March 02, 2003
March 09, 2003
March 16, 2003
March 23, 2003
March 30, 2003
April 06, 2003
April 13, 2003
April 20, 2003
April 27, 2003
May 04, 2003
May 11, 2003
May 18, 2003
May 25, 2003
June 01, 2003
June 08, 2003
June 15, 2003
June 22, 2003
June 29, 2003
July 06, 2003
July 13, 2003
July 20, 2003
July 27, 2003
August 03, 2003
August 10, 2003
August 17, 2003
August 24, 2003
August 31, 2003
September 07, 2003
September 14, 2003
September 21, 2003
September 28, 2003
October 05, 2003
October 12, 2003
October 19, 2003
October 26, 2003
November 02, 2003
November 09, 2003
November 16, 2003
November 23, 2003
November 30, 2003
December 07, 2003
December 14, 2003
December 21, 2003
December 28, 2003
January 04, 2004
January 11, 2004
January 18, 2004
January 25, 2004
February 01, 2004
February 08, 2004
February 15, 2004
February 22, 2004
February 29, 2004
March 07, 2004
March 14, 2004
March 21, 2004
March 28, 2004
April 04, 2004
April 11, 2004
April 18, 2004
April 25, 2004
May 02, 2004
May 09, 2004
May 16, 2004
May 23, 2004
May 30, 2004
June 06, 2004
June 13, 2004
June 20, 2004
June 27, 2004
July 11, 2004
July 18, 2004
July 25, 2004
August 01, 2004
August 08, 2004
August 15, 2004
August 22, 2004
August 29, 2004
September 05, 2004
September 12, 2004
September 19, 2004
September 26, 2004
October 03, 2004
October 10, 2004
October 17, 2004
October 24, 2004
October 31, 2004
November 07, 2004
November 14, 2004
November 21, 2004
November 28, 2004
December 05, 2004
December 12, 2004
December 19, 2004
January 02, 2005
January 09, 2005
January 16, 2005
January 23, 2005
January 30, 2005
February 06, 2005
February 13, 2005
February 20, 2005
February 27, 2005
March 06, 2005
March 13, 2005
March 20, 2005
March 27, 2005
April 03, 2005
April 10, 2005
April 17, 2005
April 24, 2005
May 01, 2005
May 08, 2005
May 15, 2005
May 22, 2005
May 29, 2005
June 05, 2005
June 12, 2005
June 19, 2005
June 26, 2005
July 03, 2005
July 10, 2005
July 17, 2005
July 24, 2005
July 31, 2005
August 07, 2005
August 14, 2005
August 21, 2005
August 28, 2005
September 04, 2005
September 11, 2005
September 18, 2005
September 25, 2005
October 02, 2005
October 09, 2005
October 16, 2005
October 23, 2005
October 30, 2005
November 06, 2005
November 13, 2005

 


Traffick - The Business of Search Engines & Web Portals

 


Home | Categories | Archive | About Us | Internet Marketing Consulting | Contact Us
© 1999 - 2013 Traffick.com. All Rights Reserved