Traffick - The Business of Search Engines & Web Portals
Blog Categories (aka Tags) Archive of Traffick Articles Our Internet Marketing Consulting Services Contact the Traffickers Traffick RSS Feed

Monday, November 17, 2008

SES Chicago is Jessica Bowman's Favorite SES Conference

Jessica Bowman, an in-house SEO expert who has built in-house SEO programs at Yahoo and Enterprise Rent-a-Car, will be back to join attendees and fellow speaking alumni for this year's Search Engine Strategies Chicago conference.

Recently Jessica was overheard telling friends that SES Chicago is her favorite SES. We caught up with Jessica to get to the bottom of this. We also asked Jessica for a few other thoughts and pointers about conference life and large-organization SEO.

Traffick: Jessica, you've been overheard stating that SES Chicago is your favorite SES conference of all! I don't hear that so much. People may mention San Jose because of the great weather and the Google Dance, or New York or London because, well, they're New York and London. Me, I have a bunch of reasons to prefer SES Toronto above any other. But Chicago?!? My Page Zero posse and I have a lot of fond memories of that conference to be sure, but maybe you can share your reasons for liking this one the best?

J.B.: It's my favorite event because it's more intimate than all of the other shows. The show is at the same location as the conference hotel, so you don't have to go out in the cold, and you can sneak a few winks during lunch if you need them. Because of this, everyone is condensed within the Hilton, which makes constant opportunities for interaction. And, there are two great bars where everyone congregates in the evenings where you can talk more candidly and interact with the speakers you saw during the day.

Traffick: Other than eating a piece of the giant candy Christmas decoration in the Hilton lobby and getting ill, I have one SES Chicago memory (non content related) that really stands out: Buddy Guy himself getting up to do a number at his blues club (Buddy Guy's). Sample lyrics: "Hey all you Yahoo people, why don't you call me on the phone..." Anyway. Do you have any spectacular memories?

J.B.: The Buddy Guy party is my fondest memory of all and one of the reasons Chicago is my favorite. Outside of that, it's the many nights of great conversation that happens at the hotel bar. The venue seems to be very conducive to conversations with attendees - I have had many eye opening conversations an met new people that have become friends.

Traffick: Fond indeed. I remember having a conversation with some of the guys in Buddy's band, and by the end of it, they were all fired up to come play at Jeff Healy's in Toronto... Your speaking and consulting generally focus on the challenges of in house SEO. Have these kinds of sessions become more popular over the years? Do you feel that the number of independent SEO shops will dwindle over time as companies bring the work in-house?

J.B.: In-house SEO sessions have definitely become more popular. When I started as an in-house SEO 6 years ago at Enterprise Rent-A-Car, I didn't meet one person who was in-house. Two years later we had the first in-house SEO session and only 20 people attended. Today it's a full house and once or twice we've even had standing room only at an in-house session.

I believe there will still be a place for independent shops, and I expect the number to decrease over time, but not in the next 3 years. I anticipate the demand for agency work among the bigger brands to dwindle, because they are starting to catch on and have the need and budget to build an in-house SEO program. I predict the needs for agencies will be more project based and bigger long-term contracts will come more from the mid-sized company who isn't ready to build out a team, but is ready to invest in SEO.

Traffick: That all makes sense. Some companies should never build in-house capacities in areas where they cannot afford the full-time expertise, or can't find a top person. And as far as all those in-house and agency positions being properly staffed, we're years away from the point where we overcome the current labor shortage of qualified SEO's, and years away from the point where this knowledge set is built into what people in a variety of professions bring to the table. You hear a lot of talk about folks 'knowing just enough to be dangerous,' and they are just that! My next question is about Yahoo, where you did in-house SEO advising. Can you share any learnings about being in the interesting position of teaching a big company that is actually a search engine, how to get better rankings in search engines?

J.B.: [Chuckle] Surprisingly, it's the same as it was for any enterprise-level organization. When I joined Yahoo!, I thought it would be different because they were a search engine and I was going to be doing things differently. It turns out that they are no different than any large company with many different divisions - politics, red tape, proving the ROI, getting SEO into the development life cycle, etc.

The biggest tips I have for enterprise-level in-house SEO programs are:

  • Get SEO injected into the development life cycle. This seems to be the most complicated and the most vital to success. It requires you to put on your detective hat and map out the entire development life cycle - who does what, when, who they give it to, who approves it, etc. Then, identify which steps and deliverables SEO needs to be involved in. It gets challenging because most companies do not have it documented in the level of detail you need for successful SEO injection. When clients bring me on board, the first thing we do are a series of intake discussions that reveal new layers of complexity with every minute. Once we know the intricate development life cycle, we identify where SEO needs to be involved when it comes to: meetings, discussions, reviews, approvals, contributions and more.

  • Train. Train again. Train one more time. Repeat. SEO is not top of mind, it's not part of the job description and in the grand scheme of things it's not truly a priority in the eyes of many people involved in SEO.

  • Establish a scorecard. At large organizations, scorecards work very well. Make it simple, yet effective and compare different divisions so that business managers can see what SEO can do for them. A piece of advice I give to clients is when creating your scorecard, run it by all the execs before you officially publish it. Some managers are sensitive about other people

Traffick: Awesome tips! Hehe. You trailed off a bit at the end there but I think you're coming through crystal clear. Managers don't like to be told they're doing a crappy job. Tact is key. Did I just say crappy? One last question. Do you have any strategy for learning and developing your talents that you apply when attending the search marketing conferences? Even conference veterans need to keep pushing the envelope and using the opportunity for continued learning, networking, and personal growth, right? How about tips for newbies?

J.B.: Tips for the newbies:

  • Talk to anyone and everyone - it's surprising who truly knows search engine marketing and who can add insights to your PPC or SEO campaigns.

  • Gather business cards and write on them - too many times I have come home with a stack of cards and struggle to remember what we discussed and why I wanted their card. One additional thing I've learned is to fold the corner of cards that are from people I want to talk to after the show.

  • Attend sessions all day - even if it's something you already know, sometimes just sitting back and listening to what others are doing will make you think about your projects from a different perspective. I have been attending search conferences for 6 years and I still take away tidbits and come up with new ideas during the most basic sessions.

Traffick: Thanks for your time and insights, Jessica! See you on December 8.

Labels:

Posted by Andrew Goodman




Monday, December 10, 2007

NYC Search Marketing Exec Lets Fly Re: SES Chicago

A particularly brittle response to the SES Chicago experience was just proferred by writer Mark Simon on MediaPost. I take issue with some of it, so here are my comments. I'll have to cut and paste liberally because they put these things behind an annoying reg-wall that 90% of my readers won't likely bother with.

M.S.: ...you'll forgive me for wondering whether the whole idea behind SES Chicago is to give the industry a hellish endurance test. After all, who but the few, the proud, and the totally search-obsessed would be willing to run the gamut of massively delayed flights, subzero Chicago winds, and crushing traffic jams to attend this thing?

Because I survived this grueling annual ordeal, here are a few observations gleaned from my experiences at the show:

Traffick: There's no point in anyone trying to argue this one. As much as I want to be loved by the SES organizers, facts are facts. Each year it's been a crazy ordeal getting from Toronto to Chicago and back in December, and this is for 59 minutes in the air! Colleagues from Victoria, BC took two days to make their way through multiple storms to enjoy a day's worth of activity. On top of that, any longer than two days in the Chicago Hilton gives me a nasty cold. This may be affecting my mood right about now. But then again, people do come out every year. Chicago's a big market, and other times of year have other things booked. Still, this act is wearing thin on even the proud and the obsessed, so a rethink is in order for 2010. I'm sure 2009 is already booked, by necessity.

1. SES keynotes keep getting weirder and weirder. I'm not talking about Northwestern Professor Don E. Schultz, whose keynote on SES Chicago Day 1 provided a good, highly relevant top-down discussion of search as a critical evolution from "push" to "pull" marketing. I'm talking about Seth Godin, whose keynote address kicked off Day 2. I like Seth but found his keynote little more than an elaborate promotional stunt for his latest book, "Meatball Sundae." Again, Seth is a bright, funny guy and I generally agree with a lot of things he says (especially his 2005 comment that "SEO is Worthless"). But my hope is that SES reins in its alarming tendency to hire mainstream marketing celebrities and starts getting some speakers with some actual hands-on search campaign experience to do its keynotes in the future.

Traffick: Among other things, Godin was talking about the futility of old-school companies trying to simplistically graft new media onto fundamentally broken models and communications assumptions. I don't know if Simon restricts his views to a very narrow part of this changing consumer environment or what, but I actually find Godin's advice practical for some day-to-day decisions, and tactics, for my business and for client businesses. I have ever since I learned to make emails "personal, anticipated, and relevant" in 1999! I work with old-school companies who get it, some who don't, web pure play retailers, and completely untried, but bold and groundbreaking, web startups. The distinctions Seth makes ring very true to me. I have no sense that he hasn't been there. In fact, I use particular strategies in his discussions (eg. flipping the funnel) to apply to these endeavors, because he does a better job illustrating them than the nouveau sprinkles-and-cherries people can. The praise for Don Schultz is well-founded - excellent speaker - but a bunch of the concepts relating to permission and the "TV-industrial complex" were pioneered by Godin or at the very least popularized by him. I find Godin the opposite of weird.

Pedagogically or whatever, it's also rather inane to suggest that we have hands-on SEM's as keynotes. Really! So we've got a conference full of cutting edge tactics that is supposed to be framed and inspired by yet another tactician? That's just not what a keynote is. A mix of inspiration and celebrity with the tacticians is the correct mix.

2. SES has got to change its name. As my colleague Dave Pasternack has noted several times, ...


Traffick: I'll stop you there and let this (rather tactical) point speak for itself, without addressing the tedious, long-winded critique of panels involving tactics that many attendees pay for like clockwork, year in and year out.

3. Where the heck was Yahoo? Google, Ask, Microsoft, and Looksmart all had a big presence at SES Chicago. But Yahoo's absence caused a good deal of after-hours speculation that Yahoo had decided to turn its back on the show because search really isn't a big part of its future. Yahoo's absence was a surprise, given that Ron Berlanger, its vice president of agency development, is on SES' board. I doubt that Yahoo is any less dedicated to search than it was a year ago: in my view, it simply had decided that the time and expense of attending wasn't worth the ROI this time round. But it was disturbing to see one of search's major players take a pass.

Traffick: I think they were at Pubcon.

4. Has the world maxed out on search shows? Maybe it was the cold weather, the timing, or the fact that SES Chicago overlapped with PubCon (which happened in much warmer Las Vegas), but SES exhibit hall traffic was definitely lower than I remember from prior SESs. This can't be good for the exhibitors whose dollars support this show. In fact, I had more than one conversation with exhibitors who were seriously thinking about canceling future SES bookings; only time will tell whether this talk was the usual show floor grumbling or an indication that the search trade show business is about to get much smaller.

Traffick: It doesn't take a genius to see that with the proliferation of conference series, and two major ones scheduled head-to-head, there is going to be some fallout. I thought I noticed an ever-so-slight drop in attendance from last year. But SES London more than doubled in attendance last year - so it's more a question of saturation in the United States, where many of the shows are relatively easy to get to and can start to cannibalize one another (even within the same series).

I'll agree with Simon on this point: SES Chicago was unduly stressful because of a sense of dislocation (largely with our past, but also with the future). But all change can be stressful. And in any case, such considerations are farthest from the minds of most ordinary attendees (whose dollars also support the show), as opposed to the nattering insiders such as Simon and myself.

Labels:

Posted by Andrew Goodman




View Posts by Category

 

Speaking Engagement

I am speaking at SMX West

Need Solid Advice?        

Google AdWords book


Andrew's book, Winning Results With Google AdWords, (McGraw-Hill, 2nd ed.), is still helping tens of thousands of advertisers cut through the noise and set a solid course for campaign ROI.

And for a glowing review of the pioneering 1st ed. of the book, check out this review, by none other than Google's Matt Cutts.


Posts from 2002 to 2010


07/2002
08/2002
09/2002
10/2002
11/2002
12/2002
01/2003
02/2003
03/2003
04/2003
05/2003
06/2003
07/2003
08/2003
09/2003
10/2003
11/2003
12/2003
01/2004
02/2004
03/2004
04/2004
05/2004
06/2004
07/2004
08/2004
09/2004
10/2004
11/2004
12/2004
01/2005
02/2005
03/2005
04/2005
05/2005
06/2005
07/2005
08/2005
09/2005
10/2005
11/2005
12/2005
01/2006
02/2006
03/2006
04/2006
05/2006
06/2006
07/2006
08/2006
09/2006
10/2006
11/2006
12/2006
01/2007
02/2007
03/2007
04/2007
05/2007
06/2007
07/2007
08/2007
09/2007
10/2007
11/2007
12/2007
01/2008
02/2008
03/2008
04/2008
05/2008
06/2008
07/2008
08/2008
09/2008
10/2008
11/2008
12/2008
01/2009
02/2009
03/2009
04/2009
05/2009
06/2009
07/2009
08/2009
09/2009
10/2009
11/2009
12/2009
01/2010
02/2010
03/2010
04/2010

Recent Posts


Google Affirms the Vital Role of Marketing and Adv...

Twitter Ad Potential: Huge (Source: History, Users...

Twitter's Monetization Model: On the Mark, or Off-...

Don't Go to Google, TripAdvisor, or OurFaves for R...

Can Search Engines Sniff Out "Remarkable"?

Yusuf Mehdi's Too-Candid Comments About Abandoning...

Google AdWords: No More Last-Click-Attribution Blu...

Ad Network Confusion Mounts

Yelp, Extortion, Spam, and ... Oh, Just Stop It!

Go Deep With Our Paid Search Training at SES New Y...

Posts by Month


07/2002
08/2002
09/2002
10/2002
11/2002
12/2002
01/2003
02/2003
03/2003
04/2003
05/2003
06/2003
07/2003
08/2003
09/2003
10/2003
11/2003
12/2003
01/2004
02/2004
03/2004
04/2004
05/2004
06/2004
07/2004
08/2004
09/2004
10/2004
11/2004
12/2004
01/2005
02/2005
03/2005
04/2005
05/2005
06/2005
07/2005
08/2005
09/2005
10/2005
11/2005
12/2005
01/2006
02/2006
03/2006
04/2006
05/2006
06/2006
07/2006
08/2006
09/2006
10/2006
11/2006
12/2006
01/2007
02/2007
03/2007
04/2007
05/2007
06/2007
07/2007
08/2007
09/2007
10/2007
11/2007
12/2007
01/2008
02/2008
03/2008
04/2008
05/2008
06/2008
07/2008
08/2008
09/2008
10/2008
11/2008
12/2008
01/2009
02/2009
03/2009
04/2009
05/2009
06/2009
07/2009
08/2009
09/2009
10/2009
11/2009
12/2009
01/2010
02/2010
03/2010
04/2010

 


Traffick - The Business of Search Engines & Web Portals

 


Home | Categories | Archive | About Us | Internet Marketing Consulting | Contact Us
© 1999 - 2013 Traffick.com. All Rights Reserved